Dining Out

For twenty years Chef Ben deForest has had a knack for creating Island restaurants that feel like parties you want to be at. But it hasn’t always been pretty.

It is becoming harder to pass the salt. Who is available to pass it?

Meet the brains and brawn behind the new Rosewater Market in Edgartown.

As the wooden fishing boat slows to a halt, twenty-three rods rest perpendicularly on the red metal railing waiting for the signal. When the motor cuts, the weighted and squid-baited lines drop immediately into the water, finding their way down about fifty feet to the bottom. Tap, tap, tap, the hits come nearly instantly. Within minutes, maybe even seconds, amid shouts and whoops, silver fish dangle from multiple lines.

With the first crocuses behind us and the passing of mud season, our thoughts turn to warmer weather. In the bar as in the wardrobe, it’s time to pivot from the heavier items that sate in the cold months to spring and summer’s lighter offerings.

You are what you eat. But new evidence shows you may also be the product of how you eat. In the new book Home for Dinner (AMACOM, $16), author Anne K. Fishel makes the case for putting mealtime back at the center of family life. And while there are plenty of recipes provided, this isn’t just about nutrition.

In the 1950s, eating fresh, local food wasn't a fad. It was a necessity.

Lately food trucks are all the rage but they’re hardly a new idea. Cowboys driving cattle in the 1800s had what were probably the first food trucks – they called them chuck wagons. In the 1890s lunch wagons did a good business catering to late-night workers. And of course mobile food trucks have been around for years, serving up food at construction sites.

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Dining Out

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