Ahh, those summer gull friends.

Wes Craven

I sat recently at my best of all possible desks, in my best of all possible jobs, as editor of the best of all possible magazines, devoted to the best of all possible islands, surrounded by the best of all possible oceans, contemplating the lobster roll. Not just any lobster roll, of course, but, that’s right, the best of all possible lobster rolls.

Paul Schneider

I’ve just finished reading a book about what birds think. About migrating, mating, nesting, eating, and feeding. Even learning to fly.

Wes Craven

Photographer Wayne Smith captures why it is we love the season known as “Not Summer.”

Ingenuity is this issue’s red thread, the motif that winds its way through the pages. At the center of it all are two very different house lots in West Tisbury, each with distinct design challenges. One is a narrow site bogged down with wetlands restrictions, a sharp drop-off, and a specimen beech tree smack in the middle of the building envelope.

Nancy Tutko

Someone knew somebody with a boat, and fishing gear wasn’t a problem: In every home on the Vineyard, there’s a closet by the stairs that smells of wet dog and holds tackle, boots, and old copies of The New Yorker.

Brian Cullman

September and October are no longer among the Island’s best-kept secrets. Early autumn on Martha’s Vineyard is a less crowded, less humid, less hectic version of summer, with bright sunny days topped off by cool, comfortable evenings.

Nancy Tutko

The forces of nature impose occasional inconveniences upon everyday Island life. A ferry cancelled due to high winds, downtown streets flooded after heavy rains, Beach Road awash with sand and surf during a nor’easter. Lately those vagaries have seemed more dramatic, sometimes even a little ominous.

Nancy Tutko

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