11.21.21

“I would say [that my work is] contemporary. You know what you’re looking at; it’s not so abstract that you can’t see what the image is.”

By Nicole Grace Mercier

11.23.21

A name implies a family: fathers and mothers, sisters and brothers, aunts and uncles. A name implies friends, and perhaps enemies.

By Paul Schneider

11.17.21

Is the mysterious American eel, once a major source of food and income on the Island, in danger of disappearing altogether?

By Nelson Sigelman

11.16.21

Years before the first enslaved Africans were brought to North America in 1619, English slavers raided the Vineyard and elsewhere and took their prisoners back across the Atlantic. One Islander managed to return.

By Andrew Lipman

10.07.21

Martha’s Vineyard Construction Company celebrates its fiftieth year.

By Barry Stringfellow

10.14.21

As they could have told you back when Saigon fell and that previous “longest war” ended, the absence of conflict is a good thing, but it is not the same thing as peace.

By Paul Schneider

10.15.21

“It’s a very specialized and kind of rarified art form….Tapestry weaving, the need to build images, is ancient.”

By Nicole Grace Mercier

10.10.21

Whose idea was it that pools couldn’t be alive? Or that ponds couldn’t be swimming pools? Not Daniel Whiting’s.

By Will Sennott

08.16.21

A coalition of young activists is optimistic that this time around the Island may, finally, be ready to create an affordable housing bank.

By Alexandra Bullen Coutts

08.22.21

At the Martha’s Vineyard Museum in Vineyard Haven, master stoneworker Lew French has created a mystical poetry garden in honor of the poet and human rights activist Rose Styron.

By Alexandra Bullen Coutts

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