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Inspired by cookbook author Susie Middleton of West Tisbury, who starts her chicken breast-side down, I came up with this recipe that combines my favorite salting technique with Susie’s cooking method.

By Catherine Walthers

12.01.12

Make your dinner even simpler by adding some vegetables to the chicken roasting pan.

By Catherine Walthers

12.01.12

Home cooks have many options when preparing roast chicken, a simple and satisfying meal.

By Catherine Walthers

12.01.12

As the Martha’s Vineyard ferry departed Vineyard Haven during a January nor’easter, photographer Wayne Smith of West Tisbury tried to use a rainhood for his lens, but it was snowing and blowing so hard in his face, it wasn’t doing much good. “I was basically shooting through this little tunnelas the boat pulled out,” he says. “Something summer visitors never see or even consider.” For some year-rounders, snowstorms are a rare but welcome

12.01.12

For the last thirty-five years, Jean Dupon has owned and operated Le Grenier at 96 Main Street in Vineyard Haven, serving French cuisine in the second-story restaurant and cultivating a devoted clientele. But now he’s ready to say au revoir to all that – the restaurant industry and its fifteen-hour days. “I’m sixty-nine years old,” he says. “It’s time to relax.”

By Erin Haggerty

12.01.12

Vintage hand-carved ducks appeal to hunters and folk art collectors alike.

By Nicole Grace Mercier

12.01.12

Many books address local and seasonal foods with an emphasis on quality and freshness. Few offer insight into why supporting local farmers and fishermen is vital to our existence, including the history of where we have been and what lessons we’ve learned along the way.

By Jan Buhrman

12.01.12

Known by a lyrical name – the Place on the Wayside – this tablet, set in granite in 1901 and rededicated in 2008 by the Daughters of the American Revolution, marks the earliest event recalled by a monument on the Island.

By Tom Dunlop

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A Snowy Passage

As the Martha’s Vineyard ferry departed Vineyard Haven during a January nor’easter, photographer Wayne Smith of West Tisbury tried to use a rain
hood for his lens, but it was snowing and blowing so hard in his face, it wasn’t doing much good. “I was basically shooting through this little tunnel
as the boat pulled out,” he says. “Something summer visitors never see or even consider.” For some year-rounders, snowstorms are a rare but welcome
occurrence on the Island, for the drama and beauty they add to winter here.

Cooking Up a Dream

For the last thirty-five years, Jean Dupon has owned and operated Le Grenier at 96 Main Street in Vineyard Haven, serving French cuisine in the second-story restaurant and cultivating a devoted clientele. But now he’s ready to say au revoir to all that – the restaurant industry and its fifteen-hour days. “I’m sixty-nine years old,” he says. “It’s time to relax.”

There's More Than One Way to Roast a Chicken

Home cooks have many options when preparing roast chicken, a simple and satisfying meal.

"Don't Shoot!"

A photo essay with style and safety tips for walkers during hunting season.

The Art of Decoys

Vintage hand-carved ducks appeal to hunters and folk art collectors alike.

How it Works: Finding Enlightenment

A few months ago, I went to a meditation group that meets regularly in the basement of the Howes House in West Tisbury...

Two Reads for Foodies

Many books address local and seasonal foods with an emphasis on quality and freshness. Few offer insight into why supporting local farmers and fishermen is vital to our existence, including the history of where we have been and what lessons we’ve learned along the way.

An Early Goodbye

Known by a lyrical name – the Place on the Wayside – this tablet, set in granite in 1901 and rededicated in 2008 by the Daughters of the American Revolution, marks the earliest event recalled by a monument on the Island.

Planning for Life

If you were to die tomorrow, what would you regret missing, not doing, or not being?

Year-Round Rowing with Beth Kramer

Pilot gigs, open-sea rowing boats, date back to the late seventeenth century. They measure thirty-two feet long with a beam just under five feet, oars up to thirteen feet long, and seating for a team of six.

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