07.01.11

Many Vineyarders are compelled to work multiple jobs. Some wouldn’t have it any other way. Mike Poirier of Edgartown has three jobs, but he’s not complaining. “I like all of my jobs. I never get burned out on any of them because I’m changing hats so often.”

By Jim Miller

07.01.11

Have you ever tromped through a pond to get to a good beach or bought a pricey ticket to attend a fundraiser that was actually fun? You must be on the Vineyard!

By Moira C. Silva

07.01.11

We once had a more personal relationship with our food. It came from our gardens or from a farm on the other side of town or a butcher shop or bakery whose owners we’d known for years. One of the great things about farmer’s markets today is that they connect us again with the sources of our food.

By Geoff Currier

06.20.11

Joseph A. Sylvia State Beach – the most public of the Island’s sea-and-sand boxes – is a two-mile-long smile on the face of Martha’s Vineyard.

By Jim Miller

05.01.11

To survey relics from the whole history of Edgartown harbor these days, you need only travel to a dive shop on the south side of Oak Bluffs.

By Tom Dunlop

05.01.11

One man claims to have stood on the Norton Point beach nearly sixty years ago, at the very moment it gave way almost beneath his feet, opening Katama Bay to the Atlantic. It was the afternoon of August 31, 1954, and J. Gordon “Pete” Ogden III – an Oak Bluffs native, paleobotanist, and specialist in the study of inland waters – later wrote that he went for a walk along the bay side of Norton Point just a few hours after a hurricane had spun out to sea.

By Tom Dunlop

05.01.11

In the usual quirky way of Chappaquiddickers, they often call their home an island even during those eras when it’s very much a peninsula, attached to the rest of Martha’s Vineyard by the barrier beach known as Norton Point. And Norton Point is so-called even though it has no “point” at all. But why? And who was Norton?

By Tom Dunlop

05.01.11

The Norton Point inlet seems to have an inherently contrary nature. People want it open when it’s not, and they want it closed when it’s open. But when they try to take matters into their own hands, nature has won every time but one.

By Tom Dunlop

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