06.18.15

An ecological crisis may not be what comes to mind when driving along Beach Road from Vineyard Haven to Oak Bluffs, with the harbor on your left and Lagoon Pond on your right and the seagulls wheeling overhead. In the summer, the Lagoon is a place of kayaks, canoes, stand-up paddleboards, and sailing lessons. In the fall, scallopers dot the surface with their dip nets and baskets and wooden peep sights, losing (or finding) themselves in the sparkling expanse. In some ways the pond is a picture of ecological health and beauty.

Alex Elvin

05.01.15

 

Ivy Ashe

05.01.15

To those who’ve been here long enough, it is known as “the yellow book,” a definitive history of the steamships and ferries that have sailed to and from the mainland going back to the start of the service, two centuries ago. Written by Paul C. Morris and Joseph Morin of Nantucket and published in 1977, The Island Steamers is a big, sprawling, somewhat roughly hewn coffee table book with the steamer Nobska on the cover, pounding her way from Oak Bluffs to Nantucket in the early 1970s.

Tom Dunlop

05.01.15

It’s springtime, and for right whales, the plankton feeding is easy. A large group of the endangered mammals were spotted via aerial surveys in the waters between Gay Head and Block Island in the late winter and spring. “That’s a really interesting area that’s had relatively little survey effort until recently,” said Philip Hamilton, a research scientist with the New England Aquarium. The surveys began because of the Cape Wind project, he said, as part of an effort to determine the impact the Nantucket Sound project would have on endangered species.

Sara Brown

05.01.15

Spring is an iffy season on the Vineyard. The ocean’s chill delays the reawakening of color and blossom for a seeming eternity while blustery winds keep summer at bay. But something is going on beneath the sea that keeps pulses racing: the spring run of striped bass, which brings these magnificent fish back to our shores from wintering grounds in the Chesapeake and elsewhere. What could be a greater affirmation that we have survived another winter and that all is right in the world of nature?

Kib Bramhall

03.01.15

For me, fishing is generally not a social activity. It is intensely personal, private, and intuitive. Except for family, I tend to be an angling loner. The concept of a fishing friend was an oxymoron until I met Luciano and was introduced to KLP.

Kib Bramhall

03.01.15

This year will be a busy one for the cadre of Islanders who keep a close eye on what’s going on at Norton Point. From fishermen to scientists, the two-and-a-half-mile barrier beach that sometimes connects Edgartown’s South Beach and Wasque on Chappaquiddick is a source of fascination. In April 2007 a northeaster broke through the beach, creating an inlet that connected Katama Bay and the Atlantic Ocean. In the years that followed, the “opening,” as it is known in local parlance, migrated eastward.

Sara Brown

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