10.01.09

It is early February. Martha’s Vineyard is in the midst of an icy winter. Yet tucked off of dirt roads and byways around the Island are edifices that contain remnants of the previous summer and whispers of the summer ahead. These greenhouses are lovingly tended by those who understand the promise of plants. Each greenhouse enables its enthusiastic owners to grow and propagate plants in flower-friendly temperatures all year long.

A worldly collection

Elaine Pace

08.01.09

Plants don’t lie, and any gardener will tell you that you don’t know a place until you know its plants. If you live on the Vineyard, or visit here, you may think you have a Ph.D. in beach. But unless you pay adequate attention to the plant life of the Vineyard’s margin of sand, you’re missing most of the subtlety of this peculiar habitat.

Matt Pelikan

07.01.09

As opposed to a throwback to a bygone era – of neatly trimmed lawns with lines of clean, white sheets billowing in the wind like flags of the American dream, and of A Streetcar Named Desire separation of the classes with undershirts, bras, and tired nightgowns strung from urban balconies – perhaps if we renamed it a solar-drying device, the clothesline would seem more contemporary for today’s green movement. Either way, its time has come around again. The clothesline is back.

Linda Black

05.01.09

Simon Hickman puts up arbors with the same ease and frequency that I put up excuses. When you tour the grounds surrounding his home on Lambert’s Cove Road in West Tisbury, they’re as abundant as sparrows and each has its own distinct personality.

Geoff Currier

05.01.09

A gymnast poses mid-split – head and hands straight down, legs up and splayed improbably in the air above – while the balance beam below seems to be floating. A man plays a piano in a suggestively intimate manner; saying where one ends and the other begins is impossible in this passionate melding of instrument and musician. A figure vaults high over a lichen-covered rock in the middle of a field, arms thrust backward in exaggerated exertion, the energy of that moment captured in perpetuity.

Charlie Cameron

04.01.09

Brookside Farm is one of those Island spots at which the tour busses slow down so passengers can admire its rural charms. With its pair of oxen grazing in a lush field surrounded by stone walls, its blossoming fruit trees, and its hillsides sloping down to a serene pond along the Tiasquam River, it is the embodiment of up-Island Vineyard beauty.

Peggy Schwier

03.01.09

Tucked away near the Lobster Hatchery in Oak Bluffs is a home that was, sixty years ago, the only one for acres around. Kerry Alley’s grandfather owned it – a campsite with a basic house, a crude toilet, and a water pump. Kerry Alley and Pat Hurley graduated one year apart from the Oak Bluffs High School, he in 1955 and she in 1956, each in a class of about twenty students. Though the couple, now married for forty-seven years, weren’t sweethearts then.

Elaine Pace

10.01.08

At the end of a West Tisbury dirt lane, on the edge of a silver-gold pond, grows Nina’s Garden. It has been there nearly three decades now, designed by an artist whose three-dimensional work was never finished, because each day when she rose and looked at it, she would see a new shape or color that it needed. But to the hundreds of viewers who have traveled to the end of the road to admire it, Nina’s Garden is a complete masterwork. It soothes. It inspires.

Phyllis Meras

Pages