Composting may seem like old news, but doing it with a bin full of worms probably doesn’t. Red wiggler worms offer great benefits to the organic gardener, producing both a natural fertilizer and an effective pesticide. And they eat your kitchen scraps.

Tom Dresser

As with certain human visitors who wear out their welcome, Martha’s Vineyard hosts many invasive plant pests: purple loosestrife, Norway maple, Russian olive, phragmites, some miscanthus, even the occasional ailanthus tree. But the grand champion of the invaders is Oriental bittersweet, Celastrus orbiculatus.

Jim Miller

We consulted with our favorite gardeners, both professional and merely obsessional, and came up with this handy to-do list for spring flower duties.

Peter Norris of Chilmark is on a quest to create the holy grail of rhododendrons.

Joe Keenan

After more than three decades designing and taking care of Vineyard gardens large and small, Peggy Schwier has learned that the best horticulture teacher of all is the garden itself.

Peggy Schwier

You stare at that dry, sandy patch of finicky Island soil in front of your home and envision a low flowering shrub that is drought tolerant and can thrive in partial sunlight. Wouldn’t hurt if the plant were a Vineyard native, too. But you wonder, is that combination possible to find?

Nicole Grace Mercier

The Sheriff’s Meadow Foundation is now in its second season of using goats to clear invasive Asiatic bittersweet vines from Cedar Tree Neck. That decision was mostly a logistical one. “We were just brainstorming different ways to manage the neck because it’s really hard to access with machinery to mow,” said Kristen Fauteux, director of stewardship for Sheriff’s Meadow.

Ivy Ashe

The only sounds were the rustling of branches and the crunching of leaves. It was a brilliant late-summer morning, and a herd of goats was having breakfast on a piece of land near Black Point Pond, where Rebecca Brown of Island Grazing was working on a private meadow restoration project. There were tall Kiko and Boer goats stretching up on their legs to grab leaves, and smaller Arapawa goats staying closer to the ground. The goats – fifty-five of them – moved down the road, eating as they went.

Ivy Ashe

Pages