When I walked the Caroline Tuthill Preserve earlier this year, what I noticed first was the aroma of the pitch pine forest, a smell that brought me back to my childhood when I used to visit my aunt and uncle who had a home very close to this sanctuary in Edgartown. The trails are narrow with soft sand, and are mostly covered by a blanket of pine needles,all of which makes for a pleasant floor to walk on.

Albert O. Fischer

I first explored Menemsha Hills more than fifty years ago, when the trails we followed were mostly made by cattle and deer. In the early 1940s, my father, with the aid of friends, had stacked a pile of boulders on the summit of Prospect Hill. His goal was to make the top of the pile roughly three feet higher than the 311-foot Peaked Hill, which is the Island’s highest point. I still to this day climb on top of that pile of boulders just to get the feeling of knowing that nobody is standing higher than me on the Vineyard.

Albert O. Fischer

South Beach in Edgartown – a playground of dunes, waves, and crowds – is the beachiest beach on Martha’s Vineyard. The quintessence of Beach.

Jim Miller

How prescribed burns can increase public safety, improve habitat, and help restore the landscape.

Matt Pelikan

Overnighting at the Martha’s Vineyard Family Campground has become a tradition for many, and newcomers continue to be lured by its many charms.

Karla Araujo

We once had a more personal relationship with our food. It came from our gardens or from a farm on the other side of town or a butcher shop or bakery whose owners we’d known for years.

One of the great things about farmer’s markets today is that they connect us again with the sources of our food.

Geoff Currier

Joseph A. Sylvia State Beach – the most public of the Island’s sea-and-sand boxes – is a two-mile-long smile on the face of Martha’s Vineyard.

Jim Miller

There’s a quiet revolution gaining momentum on ten wooded acres in Aquinnah. It’s a place where children and adults convene to learn about the natural world – without cell phones and laptops, armed only with their senses – a place where dirty fingernails and muddied feet are the norm.

Karla Araujo

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