09.01.14

Lately food trucks are all the rage but they’re hardly a new idea. Cowboys driving cattle in the 1800s had what were probably the first food trucks – they called them chuck wagons. In the 1890s lunch wagons did a good business catering to late-night workers. And of course mobile food trucks have been around for years, serving up food at construction sites.

Geoff Currier

08.01.14

It’s time for the near-annual presidential visit that focuses the world’s attention on our already bustling Island. The roadside signs will go up and those who are not too blasé will journey to the airport for the First Family’s arrival. Fourth of July bunting will be located and re-hung, and all around the Island merchants will head to their storerooms and out will come the presidential swag that didn’t sell out in years past. The hats inscribed “Summer White House Martha’s Vineyard” will be dusted off. T-shirts will, as always, abound.

Jessica B. Harris

08.01.14

If we didn’t have 250 tomato plants growing in our back field, believe me, right about now I’d be planning a serious farm-stand crawl. Island map and dollar bills in hand, I’d hop in my hot car, roll down the windows, and head out in pursuit of the Big One. You can have your prize-winning striper; for a cook-gardener like me, there is nothing like landing a perfectly ripe, obscenely juicy giant beefsteak tomato on a steamy summer day.

Susie Middleton

07.01.14

Crisply cooling and refreshing with the added “medicinal” benefit of the quinine in tonic, this most patrician of drinks evokes the most patrician of Island towns: Edgartown. In summer. On a dock. Under a flag. Wearing pink.

Jessica B. Harris

07.01.14

“It’s crispy and delicious, almost a little sweet,” says Tim Broderick, a man who knows his fluke. The Chilmark fisherman was the host of last year’s fisherman’s fish fry, an annual tradition to mark the end of the commercial fluke season and a chance for the fishermen to slow down and enjoy this summer specialty they unload daily on Menemsha docks. Their method was simple and classic: they rolled the fluke in flour seasoned with just salt and pepper and plunged it into the deep fryer, serving it alongside fried clams, garden salads, and other potluck dishes.

Catherine Walthers

07.01.14

“We brake for green beans.” That’s a new bumper sticker I’m printing up for the summer. I know, I know, green beans don’t have quite the sex appeal of, say, fresh corn or juicy peaches. But honestly, a good green bean is hard to find at the grocery store; a green bean picked fresh from the garden or the field is sweet and crunchy. And the flavor is, well, bean-y. In a very good way.

Susie Middleton

05.01.14

Gathering strawberries is like the pursuit of love. At first it seems that the best berries are always the ones two steps ahead of you, a row over from you, or in someone else’s basket.

Kate Thomas

05.01.14

I vividly recall my parents’ friends at cocktail hour sipping burnt sienna–hued drinks in glasses that now cost a small fortune in vintage shops. Back then, besuited men and women whose bright lipstick left red smears on the glasses’ rims gathered near the fireplace in our knotty pine–walled “finished” basement in the winter. In the summer, friends were known to sit in the living room of the house in Oak Bluffs sipping and talking. (Porch drinking came later!) I remember bottles with evocative names like Early Times, Four Roses, and I.W.

Jessica B. Harris

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