Wild Thing: Beach Plums

Beach plum harvests are always bittersweet.

Wild Thing: Wineberry

Wineberries taste like wineberries, true, but they don’t taste like wine.

Wild Thing: Fiddleheads

A fern is a fern is a fern is a fern, except for a brief time when it’s a fiddlehead.

Wild Thing: Dandelion

Dandelions get no love; even its scientific name seems like a rebuke. And yet the hardy little weed is surprisingly useful: it provides an early food source for bees and nourishment for the soil.

Wild Thing: Fox Grape

No, there aren’t any vineyards on Martha’s Vineyard. Nor are there any wineries. Many a tourist’s hopes have been dashed upon discovering this is not the Napa of the East. Still, there are plenty of wild grapes.

Wild Thing: Blue Crab

The Chesapeake may be crab country, but their same famed blue crabs – the ones New England restaurateur and cookbook author Jasper White has called “the gold standard for crab cocktail” – swim along our shores, too.

Wild Thing: Watercress

Step away from the kale. There’s a new nutrient-dense king in town.

Wild Thing: Blueberries

(Vaccinium corymbosum,Vaccinium angustifolium)

Blueberries won’t ripen until June (at least), but spring is the perfect time to scout locations. The plants have small white or pink bell-shaped flowers that make them easy to identify. If you find a good stash, take note, and then keep quiet. Wild blueberries are in high demand.

Wild Thing: Oysters

It’s a strange twist of fate that oysters, often described as nature’s aphrodisiacs, are such funny-looking things.

Wild Thing: Bay Scallops

Forget hunting or fishing – starting in October, gathering sweet bay scallops is where it’s at.

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