06.18.15

A rose by any other name? The bright orange-red fruits of the flowering Rosa rugosa plant have been called many things: beach tomatoes, beach plums (incorrectly), and in their native Japan, shore eggplants. High in Vitamin C and iron, they were once used to ward off scurvy, but today are commonly used in jellies, liqueurs, and teas.

Where to look: Close to the ocean, near dunes and beach paths. Rosa rugosa is easily identified by bright white and pink flowers that begin to bloom in June; rose hips begin to ripen in July.

06.18.15

A gin and tonic is lovely and a glass of Provençal rosé can be delightful. But let’s face it, when the thermometer begins to hit summer highs, there is nothing as cooling as a frosty mug of beer. Perhaps that’s why beer is one of the world’s oldest beverages. Patrick McGovern, scientific director of the Biomolecular Archeology Project for Cuisine, Fermented Beverages, and Health at the University of Pennsylvania Museum, has traced the earliest confirmed barley beer to the central Zagros Mountains of Iran and dated it to c. 3,400–3,000 B.C.

Jessica B. Harris

05.01.15

Farm-to-table. Locavore. Seasonal. Organic. Heirloom. These are terms that have been driving cutting-edge food and enriching the culinary vocabulary in the past few decades. Before then? Not so much.

Florence Fabricant

05.01.15

With the first crocuses behind us and the passing of mud season, our thoughts turn to warmer weather. In the bar as in the wardrobe, it’s time to pivot from the heavier items that sate in the cold months to spring and summer’s lighter offerings.

Jessica B. Harris

05.01.15

There’s no conspiracy or anything – in fact, people will be happy to tell you if you ask. It’s just that some of the best food on the Vineyard is hidden. You need to find the back door, or the side door, or the dirt driveway with no sign. Timing is everything, too. If you want Back Door Donuts or Chilmark Chocolates or armfuls of wild watercress and bucketfuls of mussels, you need to know what hour, what day, and what season to go hunting for them.

Susie Middleton

11.11.14

You are what you eat. But new evidence shows you may also be the product of how you eat. In the new book Home for Dinner (AMACOM, $16), author Anne K. Fishel makes the case for putting mealtime back at the center of family life. And while there are plenty of recipes provided, this isn’t just about nutrition.

11.11.14

Beetlebung, Mocha Mott’s, Espresso Love, and the Keurig machine at Martha’s Vineyard Savings Bank keep the Island well caffeinated with an array of coffee ranging from Arabica to mocha/java. But it’s tea – not coffee – that has a longstanding Vineyard history going back centuries. After all, we even have a Tea Lane. Originally known as Dye-leaf Road, the way was used by those in search of wild indigo and other botanicals.

Jessica B. Harris

11.11.14

Here I thought I was Ms. Brussels Sprouts. I roasted them, I braised them, I sauteed them, I stir-fried them. Honestly, I was nothing short of a Brussels sprout cheerleader, enthusiastically embracing this cute little brassica that bore the unfortunate burden of a dark past. Once the soggy poster boy for horrid prep-school cuisine, cooked to death by a fateful dunk in a cauldron of boiling water, now the little vegetable was finally caramelizing its way to a sweet and crispy new life.

Susie Middleton

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