04.01.08

Life-altering experiences come in all shapes and sizes. Barbara Ronchetti’s was about four feet tall with a long neck and pointed ears. Such is the power of an alpaca.

By Geoff Currier

07.01.07

The Chappy ferry is making headlines. Passenger rates may go up, the lines may get longer, and the owner plans to sell. A look at the history of the service shows this isn’t exactly new news.

By Tom Dunlop

12.01.06

No one knows for certain who the first person was to create scrimshaw; however, chances are his inspiration came not so much from a creative muse as it did from a state of boredom. According to Tom DeMont, owner of Edgartown Scrimshaw, scrimshaw originated on American whaling ships in the 1700s. Because whaling was so dangerous, men were unable to work at night, and scrimshaw became a way for them to occupy their idle hours.

By Geoff Currier

09.01.06

As a kid, hanging around the Concordia shipyard in Padanaram in New Bedford, Frank Rapoza was fascinated by the way boats were caulked. Everyone said, Why learn a dying art – after all, fiberglass is the future. Undaunted, Frank convinced one of the old-timers at the yard to teach him his craft, and today, what with the building of so many large wooden vessels up and down the eastern seaboard, Frank’s services are in great demand.

By Geoff Currier

08.01.06

Lobsterville Beach after dark in summer months is particularly alluring to Vineyard fishermen. And to young children, the adventure of fishing Lobsterville at night is about as good as it gets. We were introduced to Lobsterville by my friend Bob, who was a master of the tides at Lobsterville.

By Joe Tate

08.01.06

As we sat in the control tower, Michelle Meyers, the tower manager of the Martha’s Vineyard Airport, glanced out at the horizon and said, “All right, see this plane coming in?” “Ah, no, I don’t.” “Look low, just above the tree line; see it?” I walked over to the window. “Damn, Michelle, I don’t see a thing.” Of course, by this time Michelle had already turned her attention to about fifty other things and I was left thinking to myself, I could never do this.

By Geoff Currier

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