05.01.08

On June 24, 2007, a group of twenty-three ten- and eleven-year-olds, fresh out of the Oak Bluffs School for the summer, gathered with their families along the Black Dog Wharf in Vineyard Haven. Accompanied by six chaperones, these students were about to cast off their normal summer luxuries – television, video games, indoor plumbing, families – to set sail on the Black Dog’s tall ship Shenandoah, owned by Captain Robert Douglas and his family.

By Meredith Downing

05.01.08

Just look down. As Jill Bouck, curator of the Martha’s Vineyard Museum, explains, “You’ll find arrowheads all over the Island. If you’re tilling a garden, digging a foundation, or just walking down a dirt road, keep your eyes open – you never know what you might find.” The archeological history of the Vineyard is a rich one, stretching back to the Paleoindian Period – 9,500 to 11,500 years ago. While very rare, a handful of spearheads have been found dating back to that period.

By Geoff Currier

05.01.08

I’m not much of a gardener. Don’t know the practical difference between a shovel and a spade. Can’t figure out what to do with a hoe – seems like after I use one, my back aches, and while I use one, I look like I should be strapped into a straightjacket and sent to a loony bin. Maybe there’d be some nice gardens there.

By HJ Bernstein

05.01.08

I became interested in moving to Martha’s Vineyard about thirty years ago through my conversations with Terry McCarthy. He was a state representative based on the Vineyard, and I was assistant regional director of Region Six [Boston] for the Department of Youth Services. I met Terry at the Golden Dome pub on Beacon Hill. A lot of state business was conducted there, and I was familiar with the place because I used to sit in the barbershop next door talking with Billy Bulger [who became president of the state senate during this time].

By Jim Kaplan

04.01.08

Honeysweet, sticky, mysterious. Seductive. The stuff of poets, prophets, and pharaohs. Egyptian hieroglyphics depict apiarists collecting honey for cooking, cosmetics, and mixing into ointments. Legend has it that honey is the elixir that Cupid dips his arrow into before aiming keenly at the desired one’s heart. For most of us – love struck or otherwise – honey is the simple melting sweetness that swirls and dissolves into a steamy cup of tea.

By Ali Berlow

04.01.08

Okay, I admit it. I like stuff. I like having it. I like finding it. I’m the kind of person who follows the fliers all the way to a yard sale in Aquinnah and wants to buy the whole yard.

By Niki Patton

04.01.08

Pique assiette mosaic artist Jenifer Strachan is an artisan in the oldest sense of the word, a highly skilled craftsman. Although the name pique assiette – which means “plate thief” or “stolen from plates” – was not coined until the 1930s, it is an antediluvian craft dating back to ancient Greece and Rome when bits of terra cotta pottery, glass beads, and gems were used to add color to wall tableaus.

By Linda Black

04.01.08

Life-altering experiences come in all shapes and sizes. Barbara Ronchetti’s was about four feet tall with a long neck and pointed ears. Such is the power of an alpaca.

By Geoff Currier

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