08.01.06

In Oak Bluffs, at the turn of the last century, the houses that line Ocean Park had earned the nickname Millionaire’s Row. Philip Corbin, who made his fortune in locks, built what is now a favorite sightseer’s stop – the Peter Norton house – a few doors down from the home belonging to John and Sharon Kelly.

By Brooks Robards

08.01.06

Bob Holt of the West Tisbury Fire Department flips burgers at the Agricultural Fair each August. We gave him a disposable camera last year and asked him to shoot what he sees from his perch. “It was bloody hot behind the grill,” says Bob. “Thursday was the biggest day the hamburger booth ever had, and I’ve been doing this at least fifteen years. My two sons Ron and Bobby helped out.

By Tom Dresser

08.01.06

Lobsterville Beach after dark in summer months is particularly alluring to Vineyard fishermen. And to young children, the adventure of fishing Lobsterville at night is about as good as it gets. We were introduced to Lobsterville by my friend Bob, who was a master of the tides at Lobsterville.

By Joe Tate

12.01.04

It finally happened the other day. Four people in line at the coffee shop, and I knew every one of them.    

By Mark Jenkins

12.01.04

Like so many ambitious enterprises, it began on a whim. In February of 2002 my canary yellow – I called it Tweetie Bird – Dodge Colt died. It was a typical Vineyard car, meaning that to take it off-Island practically assured you of getting stranded far from home with either a defunct car or a massive mechanic’s bill. I’d bought it from my sister, who’d already built up a good 100,000 miles on it.

By Holly Nadler

10.13.01

Chilmark Pottery, off State Rd. across from Nip ‘n' Tuck Farm, West Tisbury. 508-693-6476. Daily demonstrations. Open Monday-Sunday 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Christina Gallery, 32 N. Water St., Edgartown, 508-627-8794, christina.com. Open daily 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Cobalt Gallery, 553 State Rd., West Tisbury, 508-693-2052. "Small Works" November 23-January 1. Wednesday-Sunday 2-6 p.m.

10.01.01

And finally, eventually, most of the visitors are gone from the streets and the galleries and the bed-and-breakfasts. For most Islanders, that means a return to the essential, ordinary lives of work, family and school.

By Hollis L. Engley

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