07.01.09

Years ago I asked a friend who was pretty handy with a hammer and saw how to build a tree house. He gave me three rules: 1. Try to use materials you have on hand.2. Get the kids involved.3. Use cantilevers. Great, I thought, what’s a cantilever?

By Geoff Currier

07.01.09

I recently had the opportunity to go to Washington, D.C., and not meet the Obamas. I was hoping to run into them, perhaps over dinner at the White House, but that didn’t work out.

By Kate Feiffer

07.01.09

Growing up on Martha’s Vineyard, I’m a born host. Friends start popping up with the crocuses in the spring, checking our availability for weekends in July and August, and my husband, Dave, and I are happy to oblige. Last July, an unplanned and uninvited visitor arrived seeking haven. This was not a college friend or long-lost cousin, nor even the same species.

By Linley Dolby

07.01.09

Lucy Mitchell is an artist who can’t go for a walk without dragging home a tree trunk or a pocketful of pebbles. She long ago observed that simple objects found in nature spark a strong creative impulse in her, and she has been using them in her artwork ever since. Over the years, thousands of these natural artifacts have made their way into her studio.

By Nancy Tutko

07.01.09

Out on the water the sun starts to go down, an orange ball dropping into the ocean, the kind of daily finale the tourists applaud at Menemsha in August. Lev Wlodyka watches it appreciatively, and suddenly prime time has arrived. The monofilament peels off my reel, and as I wait for the moment to set the hook Lev starts to coach. “Hit him, hit him, hit him!”

By David Kinney

07.01.09

The Martha’s Vineyard Agricultural Society Livestock Show and Fair has been part of my family’s culture for generations. I grew up hearing old Fair stories from my grandfather and other elders, and remember sitting in my grandparent’s Music Street home, waiting for the church bells to chime – then I knew the Fair had begun.

By Morgan Taylor Lucero

07.01.09

On a breezy July day, a fleet of a hundred sailboats of many shapes and sizes gathers in Vineyard Haven, united by a love of sailing and racing. The harbor bustles with its usual mid-summer activity, and the diverse fleet dodges the Island Home and other vessels on their way to and fro. Out on the course, the skies are hazy as boats round a bell buoy serving as a mark, some with barking of orders and frantic cranking of winches, while others have sailors with glasses of wine in hand.

By Jim Miller

07.01.09

All Frank Dunkl needs is some land and a library card. He cuts an incongruous figure, Frank, surrounded by the lush, green skunk cabbage and moss-decked oaks of his family’s twenty-three-acre property. In his work scrubs, complete with a packed key chain, well-clipped moustache, and gray hair sprouting from under a company cap, the sixty-four-year-old president of Chilmark Spring Water Company Inc. looks a little like a subway operator.

By Sam Bungey

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