05.01.09

After the long, cold winter we spent indoors, spring has arrived to push us outside to collect new green leaves and dig up fat roots. This is the time, according to tradition, for spring cleaning – and we don’t mean the house. We’re referring to an ancient folk belief about cleaning the blood, renewing the spirit, and energizing the body.

By Holly Bellenuono & Catherine Walthers

04.01.09

This is the tale of a marriage, a home, and a berry patch. All three happened synchronously in a whirlwind stretch of 2007, when Stacy San Severino and I tied the knot in June and moved into our new house in Chilmark in mid-August. Together with her three young children (Henry, eleven, and identical twin daughters Ruby and Nina, seven), we tumbled into our new home after a summer spent at my mother’s house while our mid-sized modular was being constructed.

By Julian Wise

04.01.09

Heading out at low tide with a sturdy rake and a floating basket, and wading through the Vineyard’s shallow waters can provide for good eating. And clamming, for the Vineyarders who love it, is more than just the pursuit of a tasty quahaug supper. A few hours spent plying the clam flats also offer a chance to escape from whatever one must – to explore the mystery of life hiding just below the surface of all that salty water, and to connect with a culturally rich past.

By Charlie Cameron

03.01.09

Brookside Farm is one of those Island spots at which the tour busses slow down so passengers can admire its rural charms. With its pair of oxen grazing in a lush field surrounded by stone walls, its blossoming fruit trees, and its hillsides sloping down to a serene pond along the Tiasquam River, it is the embodiment of up-Island Vineyard beauty.

By Laura D. Roosevelt

12.01.08

The Vineyard has plenty of amenities to offer its inhabitants, but there’s one thing many would say is missing that would make life complete: a plentiful supply of ethnic food, preferably reasonably priced. When off-Island, Vineyarders make a point to get our fill from ethnic restaurants in Boston or New York, or else pick up takeout on the Cape to enjoy on the boat ride home.

By Catherine Walthers

11.01.08

Legend has it that in 1816 Henry Hall of Barnstable County cleared the brush from around some native cranberry plants, and as a result, sand from a nearby dune blew onto the plot. Henry was surprised to find that instead of the cranberries being destroyed, they actually flourished and produced a wonderful crop. And so was born the modern cultivated cranberry bog.

By Geoff Currier

10.01.08

As she spent the summer promoting and signing copies of her new cookbook, Table Talk, Espresso Love’s Carol McManus found affirmation for the idea the book is based on – that busy Americans are gradually giving up an important aspect of family life: the family dinner. She thinks that’s a mistake.

By Catherine Walthers

09.01.08

It’s 5:30 a.m. on a Sunday morning and Allen Healy walks down the worn path from his house to the barn. It’s a warm summer day, and he gets right to work. He sanitizes two milk buckets as well as the equipment to milk his cows.

By Catherine Walthers

Pages